Founder of Wordpress (FULL INTERVIEW)
Founder of Wordpress (FULL INTERVIEW)
32 minutes 30 seconds
Wordpress-How It All Began
Wordpress-How It All Began
4 minutes 0 seconds
How Wordpress Makes Money
How Wordpress Makes Money
2 minutes 43 seconds
Why Growth Won’t Make Your Company Crappy (Proven By Founder Of Wordpress)
Why Growth Won’t Make Your Company Crappy (Proven By Founder Of Wordpress)
3 minutes 45 seconds
What WordPress Looks For When Hiring
What WordPress Looks For When Hiring
1 minute 35 seconds
Biggest Misconceptions of Raising Money (Debunked by the Founder of Wordpress)
Biggest Misconceptions of Raising Money (Debunked by the Founder of Wordpress)
3 minutes 19 seconds
How To Get The Founder Of WordPress To Invest In Your Idea
How To Get The Founder Of WordPress To Invest In Your Idea
3 minutes 19 seconds
Proprietary Software vs Open Source
Proprietary Software vs Open Source
5 minutes 3 seconds
Two Most Important Responsibilities Of A Startup CEO
Two Most Important Responsibilities Of A Startup CEO
1 minute 58 seconds
Here’s What Keeps The Founder of WordPress Ceaselessly Compelled by His Work
Here’s What Keeps The Founder of WordPress Ceaselessly Compelled by His Work
6 minutes 22 seconds
WordPress Fixed This Mistake & Doubled Their Revenue
WordPress Fixed This Mistake & Doubled Their Revenue
1 minute 34 seconds
2013 Voyage @Sea Full Interview Interview Leadership Scaling Technology

Founder of WordPress Shares Everything

Communication is the oxygen of your company. Tweet This Quote

Bio: Matt is the founding developer of WordPress, the Open Source software used by over 15% of the web, including this site. He is one of PC World’s Top 50 People on the Web, Inc.com’s 30 under 30, Business Week’s 25 Most Influential People on the Web, and Vanity Fair’s Next Establishment. According to Google, Matt Mullenweg is the #1 most important Matt in the world, but really he’s just a kid born and raised in Houston, Texas. He writes code, prose, and music, and he’s taken a few pictures too.

As a founder, the most important things you do are hire your team and set the culture. Tweet This Quote

WordPress is “a state-of-the-art semantic personal publishing platform” but more importantly WordPress is a part of who Matt is. Like eating, breathing, and music, Matt just can’t not work on WordPress. Matt considers himself to be very lucky to work on something he loves so much. Matt used to do consulting and go to school in Houston, and then he moved to San Francisco where he worked at CNET Networks. In late 2005, Matt founded a new startup Automattic, which is the company behind WordPress.com, Akismet, and more to come. Matt is also an advisor to Sphere and WeGame.

Working with people is endlessly more compelling because every single situation is unique. Tweet This Quote

About the author

Unreasonable Media

Unreasonable Media

As a company, Unreasonable Media is dedicated to leveraging the power of stories to shift paradigms and solve problems. That's why we have made almost all the videos you see on this site. Long story short, we are not your average production company. Visit our site to see for yourself.

  • erinleigh28

    I am wondering the same thing. It’s one thing to start a website, it’s another to make sure people know about it. It sounds like there might have been “leftover” customers from the abandoned site, though.

  • erinleigh28

    I had to laugh about the part were he says he comes across as abrupt or even angry in email communication even though he’s a laid-back guy. My husband is the same way and I keep trying to convince him to use smiley faces too!

  • KE7JLM

    I love WordPress and I love opensource software. With out the generosity of these opensource programmers the PC industry would not look anything like it does now. Opensource software speeds up development of PC tools and also makes powerful PC tools freely available to all who have the drive to do something. Closed source software leads to expensiveness premiums, bugs, and security holes.

  • ali Alamri

    Matt is the founding developer of WordPress and he did great job to this world.

  • KE7JLM

    Yes he did. With out WordPress and other open source application the world would not be what it is today.

  • l2yza

    I just click on this with the intention just to watch a minute or two to see what the founder was like, since I myself and a beginning WordPress user. Then 30+ minutes later the video ended and I was blown away. What a cool and inspirational guy, someone we should all try and take away something from.

  • Agreed @KE7JLM:disqus ! My favorite quote has to be “Smileys are amazing – use them liberally, but not passive aggressively.” I am so impressed by Matt Mullenweg and his treating-people-as-the messiah mentality that has formed WordPress’ culture. One of my favorite things was learning how WordPress has rotating responsibilities for their team so all employees no matter what their title have empathy for one another.

  • Faisal AH

    I really love the WordPress and I like the software. And Matt did a really good job

  • catec18

    I like what he said and I think it can relate to many jobs. Yes some jobs may be looking for at least a little experience in the field. But aside from that, many companies look for unteachable skills. High work ethic, integrity, a willingness to learn. These are just some things that are harder to train once you hire someone. And these types of things are the reason I have my current job. I didn’t believe I deserved or had the skills to do a good job being a Resident Assistant at my university but when I asked my boss why she hired me, she said it was because I had some unteachable skills. The rest she was willing to train.

  • Radaya123

    I stay preaching this, communication is key. It baffles me sometimes when I see relationships and know what the problem is before I am even told because it is clearly someone not expressing themselves properly and communication happens in many ways so just talking about it is only half the battle.

  • Storm Hurwitz

    WordPress is incredible, and I love the idea of communication being oxygen. Communication is the breathing function of an organization: if the communication is restricted, the organization fails.